Surfing The Wierd

Sunday, May 18, 2008

Gomphothere - ancient elephant kin

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080508/ap_on_sc/earliest_americans
  1. Short article and picture of gomphothere elephant, from the Natural History ... Description of a Gomphothere exhibit from the website of Sierra College ...
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gomphothere - Cached
  2. The Gomphotheres are a diverse group of extinct elephant-like animals (proboscideans) that were widespread in North America during the Miocene and Pliocene epochs, 12-1.6 million years ago. Some also lived in parts of Eurasia and Beringia, and following the Great American Interchange, in South America. From about 5 million years ago onwards, they were slowly replaced by modern elephants, but the last South American species did not finally become extinct until as recently as 400 CE[1].

    Gomphothere remains are common at South American Paleo-indian sites.[2] One example is the early human settlement at Monte Verde, Chile, dating to approximately 14,000 years ago.

  3. The image “http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f7/WPHubeiPlatybeladon.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
  4. A gomphothere is a four-tusked relative of mastodons which are in turn distantly ... two curved upper tusks, the gomphothere had four straight tusks, two upper, ...
    sierracollege.edu/.../NatHistMus/exhibitsIn/gomphothere.htm - Cached
  5. GOMPHOTHERE FOSSILS TEETH JAW FOSSIL... jaw of a Pliocene era Gomphothere Cuvieronius tropicus, a bizarre prehistoric ... original teeth and the final set of molars the gomphothere grew prior to death. ...

    www.paleodirect.com/pgset2/lm60-001.htm

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